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Rebel

01.Jul.09 20:17:01 | Post #301 |

I am proud to say i was on rememberance day parade a couple of times when we had to go up to the monument  we played the last post  and revellie ?    and sang abide with me  it was hard not to laugh when you heard Wilf Deacan start off the hymn  we wernt disrespectful  just schoolboys  neutral  then in the evening if memory serves we went to st pauls for an evening service and played last post and revellie  again it sounded superb in the church we played it from behind the alter out of sight  for the congragation it must have been awesome  .what you have to remember the war had only been over 25 years or so and a lot of relatives of those Roytoners who died in the war were there  .  Nostalgic memories of 1855 squadron .

the angels sword was stolen first i believe  of the angel herself i cant remember if all that got stolen or it was stolen in parts  , what kind of scoundrel would desicrate and destroy such a thing the mind boggles      rebel


I was in the house when the house burned down.

Rebel

01.Jul.09 20:17:04 | Post #302 |

I am proud to say i was on rememberance day parade a couple of times when we had to go up to the monument  we played the last post  and revellie ?    and sang abide with me  it was hard not to laugh when you heard Wilf Deacan start off the hymn  we wernt disrespectful  just schoolboys  neutral  then in the evening if memory serves we went to st pauls for an evening service and played last post and revellie  again it sounded superb in the church we played it from behind the alter out of sight  for the congragation it must have been awesome  .what you have to remember the war had only been over 25 years or so and a lot of relatives of those Roytoners who died in the war were there  .  Nostalgic memories of 1855 squadron .

the angels sword was stolen first i believe  of the angel herself i cant remember if all that got stolen or it was stolen in parts  , what kind of scoundrel would desicrate and destroy such a thing the mind boggles      rebel


I was in the house when the house burned down.

ridge walker

01.Jul.09 22:04:17 | Post #303 |

I remember the theft at the time, the plaques were found in a hedgerow near the Tandle Hill Tavern having been carried down the hill, it looked like the theives were on the way to Kirkolt, the estate across the M62 but it was only fields then, must have been too heavy to carry any further.

Looking at Frances book "Royton" theres a good photo of the scouts jamborette taken in 1958, they are shown gathered round the flag during the 3 day event on 14th June.  This raising of the flag by scouts who regularly met in the park using a brick building as a base once used by the gamekeeper, this was on the top walk and now planted with beech trees on the site, the flag pole became known by me as flagstaff hill, i requested a bench be placed here  also the topograph at the monument when the rangers first took over as they are favourate view points of mine and once had the Chadderton power station cooling towers as the main feature to be seen,  no scouts have visited since the building was demolished.

The war memorial had a pure white marble surround with ornate cast iron pillers supporting a chain, not the fence you see today, every year poppy wreaths are left on the site and i know that people remember the sacrifice and this is the place they choose to lay them.  I repect that.

Rebel

01.Jul.09 22:11:07 | Post #304 |

My uncle was on one of those tablets  he was killed in italy  there are a few good stories about him that my mam and dad told us kids  if there ever is a topic about such things maybe they will interest someone  , he is buried in italy . i have a photo that he had on him when he was injured  he carried it around with him  must have been returned to my grandmother .


I was in the house when the house burned down.

TimH

01.Jul.09 23:56:06 | Post #305 |

Here are the photos requested by Ridge.

scan0001-3.jpg

Tandle Hills taken in 1910 long before it became an official country park

scan0002-2.jpg

An invite for the mayor of Oldham to the opening in 1919.

scan0003-1.jpg

The stone down near where the old main entrance used to be on Oozewood Road. Note that the date for the Great War goes up to 1919 because it includes those British soldiers fighting alongside the White Russians against the Bolsheviks which was still going on at the time the stone was laid.

DSCF0324.jpg

A more recent photo.

TimH

02.Jul.09 00:13:41 | Post #306 |

roytonrebel wrote:

My uncle was on one of those tablets  he was killed in italy  there are a few good stories about him that my mam and dad told us kids  if there ever is a topic about such things maybe they will interest someone  , he is buried in italy . i have a photo that he had on him when he was injured  he carried it around with him  must have been returned to my grandmother .

I'd be very interested to read about him Rebel. A few years ago I visited old soldiers who served in the Durham Light Infantry and wrote down their experiences for the DLI museum and it was quite harrowing at times what they went through at places like Dunkirk and Crete as well as the victories that came later. If anybody has living relatives who fought in the war why not ask them about their experiences and write it down for posterity. You could keep it to pass down within the family or hand it in at the local history library so it can be kept as a record. It is a sad fact that as the years pass by it all becomes sanitised and we end up with the Hollywood version and it all gets forgotten that almost every family in Britain was affected in some way.

EJay

02.Jul.09 04:39:01 | Post #307 |

Your writing on these topics is never-ending interesting
Tim  smile  Sterling effort and much appreciated


The 1910 photo is a bit erie tho  roll

ridge walker

02.Jul.09 18:09:58 | Post #308 |

The little hill where the stone is located now has trees planted upon it, a strip was left open from the Oozewood gate to the stone and now forms a footpath that continues past and through the grass meadow where the scouts camped and also where the caravan club once stayed, this land was farmed for vegitables during the war and cleared from the moorland grasses.

On the opening day a stand was built like a boxing ring with bunting, where the ceremony and speeches were made, this was lower down the hill where the new dipping pond is situated and the lawn type grass area in front was filled with poeple, just to one side were toilet blocks and further up the valley lay the paddling pool, between the two a footpath ran directly up to flagstaff hill and this is now part of Oldham Way, a branch path down to the right is where the 1910 picture was taken,at that time the estate was private.

This path lead to the roofed shelter that had two sides and seating in 1970 and the mainroute through the woods, as it rose up towards the memorial it branched into two and a second group of toilets where the Rhoddydendrons are now planted, as you turn right at the top the track was surfaced the edges were curbed and the surface cobbled, you can see the remains under the leaf litter as you reach the elbow at the Thornham gate then the lovel curving route to the summit mount.

clutter

03.Jul.09 23:10:49 | Post #309 |

TimH wrote:

Ridge when you see Frances Stott as her if she has any original photos that may be copied. I got most of these photos from my cousin on a disc and a few are postcards that have been passed down through the family and those are the ones I have been able to make bigger by scanning at a high resolution. I've also bought a few copies over time from John & Kate's but they are expensive and very poor quality. Any original photos would be great though so that they could be scanned and put on here at a larger size and also get some printed for Bernard for the lounge area in the new flats.

I got quite a bit of information from her books in the local studies library as well as A History of Royton Pubs, The Gazeteer of Oldham Mills and A History of Oldham by Hartley Bateson which is the best book on local history that I have read.

Tim I thought Frances got the photos for the book from the Local Studies Library?

Rebel

04.Jul.09 09:08:57 | Post #310 |

The paddling pool was fed by the stream  and in summer the hill where all the conifers are was were you could sit and have your sauce butties and water cool


I was in the house when the house burned down.

Hattie

05.Jul.09 19:46:10 | Post #311 |

I remember the paddling pool. It was lovely on a hot day, before turning around and slogging back home. We didn't have the butties, but on a good day we would have 'Spanish Spo'. Did anyone else ever dissolve hard spanish from the chemist into a bottle of water? I don't think you can still get the proper stuff, can you? Has anyone seen any? smile


Why fit in when you can be outstanding?

TimH

05.Jul.09 22:56:40 | Post #312 |

clutter wrote:

Tim I thought Frances got the photos for the book from the Local Studies Library?

She did Clutter and there are a lot of photos up there too but they will only allow copying for publications.

ridge walker

06.Jul.09 12:04:16 | Post #313 |

Tim, not forgotten, will see Francis tonight  she knows of our interest as i have mentioned it to her before i recognised the content, spent a hour going through library books last week on display near the door, many are for sale at a few pounds each.

TimH

07.Jul.09 22:10:26 | Post #314 |

ridge walker wrote:

Tim, not forgotten, will see Francis tonight  she knows of our interest as i have mentioned it to her before i recognised the content, spent a hour going through library books last week on display near the door, many are for sale at a few pounds each.

Thanks Ridge

TimH

07.Jul.09 23:04:05 | Post #315 |

DrKershaws1930.jpg

Dr Kershaw's Cottage Hospital which opened on 28th February 1931. It was provided and endowed by Dr John Kershaw who died in 1909 and it was he who also paid for the clock tower on the Town Hall. It was transferred to the Oldham & District Hospital Management Committee following the introduction of the National Health Act in 1948 but remained a cottage hospital. In the late 1970's it became famous because of the work Robert Edwards and Patrick Steptoe carried out there with the conception of Louise Brown, the world's first first test tube baby. In 1988 Dr Kershaw's was designated a hospice.

RoytonHarriers1920.jpg

Oh dear its another one of those annual eRoyton competitions and oh, hold on a minute, I've only just noticed that my grandfather and great uncle are in this photo. I will have to get hold of the original of this photo. My uncle in Australia told me a while back that he had some trophies of his dad's for cross country running that he will pass on to me and I'm right chuffed at this (one photo just e mailed to Adelaide).

Anyway going back to the competition it is the annual knobbly knees contest of course and there are a few candidates here from among our number. The clear favourite in my view is Lucky Jim who is sat to the left of the proud looking chap in his Sunday best and a bushy moustache. Very knobbly knees i think you'll agree and a bit craggy in the legs too I might add. If his face looks a bit grubby in the face it is because he has just wiped off a load of dirt thrown by a just out of picture (and very indignant) EJay for criticising her garden photos.

This is actually Royton Harriers taken in 1920. The Harriers were formed in 1898 by a group of men who got together to enter cross country events being held. In 1920 they won the South East Lancs cross country league championship and and again in 1926. They used a small hut on Shaw Road as their meeting place up until 1954 when they made their headquarters in Hillside Avenue. They used the Westwood track for training and when this track closed to make way for B&Q the club moved to Radclyffe School.

Stpauls1754.jpg

Not a great picture I'll grant you but a good excuse to give you a bit more history and how the church looked in its original form before extentions and towers were added. So anyway, Royton church was formerly a chapel of ease for the mother church at Prestwich. The site of the chapel and graveyard, Downey Field and Acre Field were sold by Thomas Percival of Royton Hall for the grand sum of 1 shilling on 9th August 1753. St Paul's was dedicated on 10th August 1754 and consecrated on 1st July 1757. The church was an oblong grey slated structure, built of brick and ornamented with stone cornices and quoins at the angles. In 1828 the chapel was enlarged with the addition of a square tower outside the original building at the west end with a weather vane added on the top.

I've a few more photos now which I will add tomorrow.

ridge walker

08.Jul.09 15:40:03 | Post #316 |

TimH, Francis will review the posts on ERoyton and see if she can help further, had a chat about it as she has not used the site before, she may contact you through the administrator of the forum so no details need posting.

While in the library last week i picked up a little book about Ferranti, it was written by himself about the family bussiness and why his father chose Hollinwood for his factory, the auther was born in Wilmslow and each of his brothers took on the roll of MD of expanding factories, each had his own way, one was an engineer, another had personel skills and got things done by charm and was well liked. The workers contribute to the story written as a factual account.  It was on display just to the left of the entrance doors with the books on local history, i flipped through it as i had only 1/2 hr to kill but it was all there with photographs, one set included a big staff members do at the Midland Hotel in M/ch at xmas, all the men in bow ties and ladies in gowns about 50 years ago.

EJay

08.Jul.09 15:43:17 | Post #317 |

ridge walker wrote:

Francis will review the posts on ERoyton

Wonders if Francis will recognise Clutter
from her style and content of writing  smile

TimH

08.Jul.09 23:55:41 | Post #318 |

AdvertforStotts.jpg

Maxster's first job after leaving school people and did it not suit him down to the ground and he certainly suited the hat.

It is an advert for Stott's of Oldham in the 1970's and their catering equipment made at the Vernon Works in Royton. The founder of the company was James Stott who was a dental surgeon, and developed a gas governor and manufactured it in a lean to workshop. By 1890 it had gained over 60 awards and in the end almost 1 million various sized governors were sold.

The first item of catering equipment was the gas kettle, produced in 1906 and closely followed by dinner warming ovens. Stott's moved to the former Fir Mill in 1962. In the 1960's the company was producing cafeteria counters, boiling pans, frying ranges (the ones for chippies), roasting ovens, cooking ranges and boilers. In 1979, and now part of Thorn Industries, the company merged with Benham & Sons Ltd to become Stott Benham. This company was then taken over by Electrolux in 1987 and the company closed in the 1990's.

LionBeeMills1910.jpg

The Lion & Bee Mills from the early 1900's.

Bee Mill
Shaw Road, Royton. Architect: Wild, Collins & Wild. Spindleage:
(1915) 102,216, Platts. Engine: George Saxon, 1,500 hp.
Built by the Bee Spinning Co. Ltd. in 1901, card shed extended in 1904. Ceased production 1964 and occupied for a number of years by Harrison and Jones, making foam blocks. Purchased by the Local Authority in April 1985 and gutted with the top two.storeys being removed. This now modernised structure is occupied by Slumberland Ltd. for the manufacture of plastics, laminates, fibres and fillings.

My dad's last job was working for Harrison & Jones at the Bee Mill when he had his first major stroke at 44 and never worked again.

Lion Mill
Fitton Street, Royton.
Architect: Wild, Collins & Wild. Spindleage: (1915) 109,680, Platts. Engine: Pollit &Wigzell, 2,000 hp.
Built in 1890, the ‘sister' mill to King and Bee, all owned by the same group. Card shed extension made in 1891 and new warehouse added the following year. The mill engine was completely re-built in 1900, the work being completed in 14 days! Ceased production December, 1967, and left vacant for a number of years whilst stripping out was in progress. Re-occupied 1969 by the Wellcome Foundation Ltd, manufacturing surgical wool and other similar products, and also acting as a retail distribution centre for the North West.

StMarksHeyside1907.jpg

St Mark's church at Heyside taken early 1900's and before the vicarage was built in 1909. The foundation stone was laid on 30th March 1877 and consecrated on 15th May 1878. There was also a mission room of course like the other churches in Royton and this was named St Chad's and erected at Higginshaw in 1894.

TimH

08.Jul.09 23:58:42 | Post #319 |

ridge walker wrote:

While in the library last week i picked up a little book about Ferranti, it was written by himself about the family bussiness and why his father chose Hollinwood for his factory, the auther was born in Wilmslow and each of his brothers took on the roll of MD of expanding factories, each had his own way, one was an engineer, another had personel skills and got things done by charm and was well liked. The workers contribute to the story written as a factual account.  It was on display just to the left of the entrance doors with the books on local history, i flipped through it as i had only 1/2 hr to kill but it was all there with photographs, one set included a big staff members do at the Midland Hotel in M/ch at xmas, all the men in bow ties and ladies in gowns about 50 years ago.

My great uncle Billy, having been wounded in WWI, operated one of the big guns on Ferranti's roof during WWII.

EJay

09.Jul.09 06:15:59 | Post #320 |

TimH wrote:

The first item of catering equipment was the gas kettle, produced in 1906 and closely followed by dinner warming ovens. Stott's moved to the former Fir Mill in 1962. In the 1960's the company was producing cafeteria counters, boiling pans, frying ranges (the ones for chippies), roasting ovens, cooking ranges and boilers.

M m m m m !   

I wasn't feeling hungry until I read that  big_smile

Looks like an early brekkie for me then
wink

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